Magnolias in Spring

Magnolia blossoms behind Building 530, Stanford. Photo credit: Linda A. Cicero

 

Spring

Monday Wednesday Friday
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
This course surveys major religious traditions of the world in all of their complexity, in relation to philosophy and politics; liturgy and literature; identity and social hierarchies; art, community, and emotion. Through examination of a variety of materials, including scriptures and other spiritual writings, religious objects and artifacts, and modern documentary, fiction and film, we explore Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Daoism as rich historical and living traditions.
Monday Wednesday
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
An exploration of two key Mahayana Buddhist scriptures (the Heart & Diamond Sutras) and their histories, looking at what they say and how they have been used, from the first millennium to the present day.
Friday
1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
This course explores the relationship between Buddhism and magic through the lens of an unstudied Southeast Asian manuscript held at Stanford's Cantor Arts Center. Working together as a class, we'll discover how to decipher the words, decode the numerological diagrams, and interpret the vivid illuminations of this unique document in light of the wider world of Buddhist witchcraft and wizardry. Prerequisites: Some background in Buddhist studies or Asian religions encouraged; no background in Southeast Asian languages required. NOTE: Undergraduates must enroll for 5 units; graduate students can enroll for 3-5 units.

Wednesday
1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Chinese Buddhist texts from the Han Dynasty onwards, including sutra translations, prefaces, colophons, story collections and biographies. Prerequisite: reading competence in Chinese.
Monday
1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Introduction to Buddhist literature through reading original texts in Sanskrit. Prerequisite: Sanskrit.
Friday
1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
This course explores the relationship between Buddhism and magic through the lens of an unstudied Southeast Asian manuscript held at Stanford's Cantor Arts Center. Working together as a class, we'll discover how to decipher the words, decode the numerological diagrams, and interpret the vivid illuminations of this unique document in light of the wider world of Buddhist witchcraft and wizardry. Prerequisites: Some background in Buddhist studies or Asian religions encouraged; no background in Southeast Asian languages required. NOTE: Undergraduates must enroll for 5 units; graduate students can enroll for 3-5 units.
Independent study in Buddhism. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.